The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race

The Code BreakerWhen Jennifer Doudna was in sixth grade, she came home one day to find that her dad had left a paperback titled The Double Helix on her bed. As she sped through the pages, she became enthralled by the intense drama behind the competition to discover the code of life. Even though her high school counselor told her girls didn’t become scientists, she decided she would.

Driven by a passion to understand how nature works and to turn discoveries into inventions, she would help to make what the book’s author, James Watson, told her was the most impo.

Rtant biological advance since his co discovery of the structure of DNA. She and her collaborators turned ​a curiosity ​of nature into an invention that will transform the human race: an easy to use tool that can edit DNA. Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions. The development of CRISPR and the race to create vaccines for coronavirus will hasten our transition to the next great innovation revolution. The past half century has been a digital age, based on the microchip, computer, and internet. Now we are.

The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna Gene Editing and the Future of the Human Race Rtant biological advance since his co discovery of the structure of DNA. She and her collaborators turned ​a curiosity ​of nature into an invention that will transform the human race: an easy to use tool that can edit DNA. Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions. The development of CRISPR and the race to create vaccines for coronavirus will hasten our transition to the next great innovation revolution. The past half century has been a digital age, based on the microchip, computer, and internet. Now we are.

Remember: The Science of Memory and the Art of Forgetting

Ormal. Why? Because while memory is amazing, it is far from perfect. Our brains aren't designed to remember every name we hear, plan we make, or day we experience. Just because your memory sometimes fails doesn't mean it's broken or succumbing to disease. Forgetting is actually part of being human.

In Remember, neuroscientist and acclaimed novelist Lisa Genova delves into how memories are made and how we retrieve them. You'll learn whether forgotten memories are temporarily inaccessible or erased forever and why some memories are built to exist for only a few seconds (like a passcode) while others can last a lifetime (your wedding day). You'll come to apprec.

Remember: The Science of Memory and the Art of ForgettingOrmal. Why? Because while memory is amazing, it is far from perfect. Our brains aren't designed to remember every name we hear, plan we make, or day we experience. Just because your memory sometimes fails doesn't mean it's broken or succumbing to disease. Forgetting is actually part of being human.

In Remember, neuroscientist and acclaimed novelist Lisa Genova delves into how memories are made and how we retrieve them. You'll learn whether forgotten memories are temporarily inaccessible or erased forever and why some memories are built to exist for only a few seconds (like a passcode) while others can last a lifetime (your wedding day). You'll come to apprec.

RememberA fascinating exploration of the intricacies of how we remember, why we forget, and what we can do to protect our memories, from the Harvard trained neuroscientist and bestselling author of Still Alice.

Have you ever felt a crushing wave of panic when you can't for the life of you remember the name of that actor in the movie you saw last week, or you walk into a room only to forget why you went there in the first place? If you're over forty, you're probably not laughing. You might even be worried that these lapses in memory could be an early sign of Alzheimer's or dementia. In reality, for the vast majority of us, these examples of forgetting are completely n.

Gory Details: Adventures from the Dark Side of Science

Every conceivable insect to the world's most murderous mammals, this book explores oft ignored but alluring facets of biology, anatomy, space exploration, nature, and . Feat.

Gory Details: Adventures from the Dark Side of ScienceEvery conceivable insect to the world's most murderous mammals, this book explores oft ignored but alluring facets of biology, anatomy, space exploration, nature, and . Feat.

Gory DetailsScience reporter Erika Engelhaupt investigates the gross, strange, and morbid absurdities of our bodies and our universe. From the research biologist who stung himself with.

Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction

Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of ExtinctionMent’s history: from early battles to save charismatic species such as the American bison and bald eagle to today’s global effort to defend life on a larger scale.

She describes the vital role of scientists and activists such as Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson as well as lesser known figures in conservation history; she reveals the origins of vital organizations like the Audubon Society and the World Wildli.

Beloved BeastsA vibrant history of the modern conservation movement—told through the lives and ideas of the people who built it.

In the late nineteenth century, as humans came to realize that our rapidly industrializing and globalizing societies were driving other animal species to extinction, a movement to protect and conserve them was born. In Beloved Beasts, acclaimed science journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the move.

Ment’s history: from early battles to save charismatic species such as the American bison and bald eagle to today’s global effort to defend life on a larger scale.

She describes the vital role of scientists and activists such as Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson as well as lesser known figures in conservation history; she reveals the origins of vital organizations like the Audubon Society and the World Wildli.

A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence

St question: How do simple cells in the brain create intelligence? Jeff Hawkins and his team discovered that the brain uses maplike structures to build a model of the world not just one model, but hundreds.

A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of IntelligenceSt question: How do simple cells in the brain create intelligence? Jeff Hawkins and his team discovered that the brain uses maplike structures to build a model of the world not just one model, but hundreds.

A Thousand BrainsAn author, neuroscientist, and computer engineer unveils a theory of intelligence, of understanding the brain and the future of AI. For all of neuroscience's advances, we've made little progress on its bigge.

Empire of Ants: The Hidden World and Extraordinary Lives of Earth's Tiny Conquerors

Empire of AntsBeneath our feet, a fascinating drama unfolds: Ants are waging war and staging rebellions, growing fungi as crops and raising aphids as livestock, making vaccines and, generally, living lives that—up close—look surprisingly human.

Evolutionary biologist Susanne Foitzik and biophysicist.

Olaf Fritsche reveal all in Empire of Ants, inviting readers to live alongside the workers, soldiers, and conquerors of the insect world—and the researchers who study them. (How do we observe the behavior of ants just a few millimeters in size—or monitor activity in a brain as small as the t.

Empire of Ants: The Hidden World and Extraordinary Lives of Earth's Tiny Conquerors Olaf Fritsche reveal all in Empire of Ants, inviting readers to live alongside the workers, soldiers, and conquerors of the insect world—and the researchers who study them. (How do we observe the behavior of ants just a few millimeters in size—or monitor activity in a brain as small as the t.